gender-and-science
mindofapharmacystudent

FDA Approves New Allergy Medicines.

mindofapharmacystudent:

NBC Nightly News (4/17, story 7, 2:30, Williams) reported in its broadcast about the potential impact on the people from the allergy season as grass starts to grow and flowers start to bloom. NBC News interviewed Dr. Rachel Szekely from Cleveland Clinic and several people suffering from allergy about their experiences, before noting that FDA had “just approved” two “new prescription” tablets to “treat certain grass pollen allergies,” with both the tablets melting under the tongue. The report noted that “Grastek is for ages five years to 65 years old,” while Oralair is “for ages 10 to 65.” Meanwhile “another, Ragwitek, is approved for ragweed pollen.”

        The AP (4/18) reported the FDA has “again approved a Merck & Co. tablet for gradually reducing seasonal allergies, this time for ragweed pollen.” The AP noted that Ragwitek tablets “dissolve quickly under the tongue,” and patients need to take one every day, from three months before ragweed season begins until it ends, for a few years. Grastek received the agency’s approval Monday.

        Reuters (4/18), HealthDay (4/18) and Medscape (4/18) also covered the news.

quantumaniac

quantumaniac:

2013 Nobel Prize In Medicine Awarded

Today, Americans James Rothman and Randy Schekman and German-born researcher Thomas Suedhof got a pleasant phone call - they were told that they were the recipients of the 2013 Nobel Prize in medicine for research and discoveries on the mechanisms by which hormones, enzymes and other key substances are transported within cells.

According to the nobel committee directly, the prize was awarded for “for their discoveries of machinery regulating vesicle traffic, a major transport system in our cells.”

NPR reports:

The Nobel committee said their research on “vesicle traffic” — the transport system of our cells — helped scientists understand how “cargo is delivered to the right place at the right time” inside cells.Disturbances to the system can contribute to diabetes and neurological and immunological disorders, the committee said.

Rothman, 62, is a professor at Yale University while Schekman, 64, is at the University of California, Berkeley. Suedhof, 57, joined Stanford University in 2008.

"My first reaction was, ‘Oh, my God!’ said Schekman in a statement released by Berkeley. "That was also my second reaction."

NPR continues:

The university said Schekman’s research led to the success of the biotechnology industry. Schekman studied normal and defective yeast to identify the process of vesicle transport, the university said.

The Nobel committee said Schekman discovered a set of genes that were required for vesicle transport, while Rothman revealed how proteins dock with their target membranes like two sides of a zipper. Sudhof found out how vesicles release their cargo with precision.

"These discoveries have had a major impact on our understanding of how cargo is delivered with timing and precision within and outside the cell," the committee said.

In some ways, the award was not entirely unexpected: Rothman and Schekman won the Albert Lasker Basic Medical Research Award for their research in 2002 — an award often seen as a precursor of a Nobel Prize.

The medicine prize was the first Nobel given this year - the prizes for physics, chemistry, literature, peace, and economics will be awarded in the following days. Each prize is worth $1.2 million. 

Source: NPR

nursefocker
emt-monster:

This is an x-ray of a 79 yo man who had lost weight and was being evaluated for swallowing difficulties. During the process of having him rapidly swallow barium (dense element that allows one to visualize structures), he aspirated the barium into his lungs. This led to respiratory failure.
The x-ray showed barium into both right and left main stem bronchi in the left upper and lower lobes. The barium spread to the smaller airways which produced the tree-in-bud appearance (arrow). This patient had the barium suctioned out (as much as possible), but he developed shock, his heart stopped beating and he suffered severe brain injury. He died a short time later.
(Source: www.anatomybox.com)

emt-monster:

This is an x-ray of a 79 yo man who had lost weight and was being evaluated for swallowing difficulties. During the process of having him rapidly swallow barium (dense element that allows one to visualize structures), he aspirated the barium into his lungs. This led to respiratory failure.

The x-ray showed barium into both right and left main stem bronchi in the left upper and lower lobes. The barium spread to the smaller airways which produced the tree-in-bud appearance (arrow).
This patient had the barium suctioned out (as much as possible), but he developed shock, his heart stopped beating and he suffered severe brain injury. He died a short time later.

(Source: www.anatomybox.com)

whatshouldwecallpharmd
thesouschef:

In this time of term papers I wanted to draw my patron deity, Bullshitticus, god of students and general last minute fudgery, sitting upon his Golden Futon, attended by the muses Caffeina and Thesaurae, whose powers of artificial energy and pretentious vocabulary can be invoked in case of the all-nighter.
I like to think he’s Dionysus’s second cousin or something.

thesouschef:

In this time of term papers I wanted to draw my patron deity, Bullshitticus, god of students and general last minute fudgery, sitting upon his Golden Futon, attended by the muses Caffeina and Thesaurae, whose powers of artificial energy and pretentious vocabulary can be invoked in case of the all-nighter.

I like to think he’s Dionysus’s second cousin or something.

greatmindsofscience
medicalschool:

Propofol is a short-acting, intravenously administered hypnotic/amnestic agent. Its uses include the induction and maintenance of general anesthesia, sedation for mechanically ventilated adults, and procedural sedation. Chemically, propofol is unrelated to barbiturates and has largely replaced sodium thiopental (Pentothal) for induction of anesthesia because recovery from propofol is more rapid and “clear” when compared with thiopental. Propofol is not considered an analgesic, so opioids such as fentanyl may be combined with propofol to alleviate pain. Propofol has been referred to as “milk of amnesia” (a play on words of milk of magnesia), because of the milk-like appearance of its intravenous preparation.
Propofol has been proposed to have several mechanisms of action, both through potentiation of GABAA receptor activity, thereby slowing the channel-closing time, and also acting as a sodium channel blocker. Recent research has also suggested that the endocannabinoid system may contribute significantly to propofol’s anesthetic action and to its unique properties. EEG research upon those undergoing general anesthesia with propofol finds that it causes a prominent reduction in the brain’s information integration capacity at gamma wave band frequencies.

medicalschool:

Propofol is a short-acting, intravenously administered hypnotic/amnestic agent. Its uses include the induction and maintenance of general anesthesia, sedation for mechanically ventilated adults, and procedural sedation. Chemically, propofol is unrelated to barbiturates and has largely replaced sodium thiopental (Pentothal) for induction of anesthesia because recovery from propofol is more rapid and “clear” when compared with thiopental. Propofol is not considered an analgesic, so opioids such as fentanyl may be combined with propofol to alleviate pain. Propofol has been referred to as “milk of amnesia” (a play on words of milk of magnesia), because of the milk-like appearance of its intravenous preparation.

Propofol has been proposed to have several mechanisms of action, both through potentiation of GABAA receptor activity, thereby slowing the channel-closing time, and also acting as a sodium channel blocker. Recent research has also suggested that the endocannabinoid system may contribute significantly to propofol’s anesthetic action and to its unique properties. EEG research upon those undergoing general anesthesia with propofol finds that it causes a prominent reduction in the brain’s information integration capacity at gamma wave band frequencies.

Soups exhausted.

Monday—
Had a pt with multiple congenital abnormalities: corpus callosum agenesis, septo optic dysplasia, blindness, with general convulsions, scoliosis, and cerebral palsy. He was being treated for pneumonia related seizures. Sweet and responsive kid with a super mom. She closely included me in his care, and left to up to me when his IV fell out through his thumb, needed his brace on, and needed to go back to bed after a 3-minute seizure on the lift.

Tuesday—
Had a nurse ride me until half the shift. The pt was a neonate being treated for jaundice—easy. But the RN was just looking for something to play with and apparently it was my patience.

Got off early and made the 30 min drive home to binge (missed a lunch) and fall asleep in my unfolded clothes.

sherpaa
sherpaa:

Everyone, not just doctors, having access to medical information is one of the most profound cultural changes in our nation’s health. It’s one that I welcome. There’s a ton of health content out there on the internet. Some is good, some is ok, and some is just plain wrong. And it’s nearly impossible for google to gauge quality. But with this profound change, comes another need:
I believe it’s our role as doctors to curate and guide our patients to the best information available to us all. I call it information therapy. 
We should be sending you to the best information, the best opinion, and the best tools you can use to understand and manage your health. It is a new and necessary role we have as doctors practicing in the age of the internet. So we just launched this feature in Sherpaa’s app. Here’s a screenshot of it. It’s simple, but profound. Here’s what your doctor thinks is the best of the internet, exclusively for you. We even recommend the best iPhone apps to help you manage your migraines. Your doctor, prescribing apps. Welcome to the future.

sherpaa:

Everyone, not just doctors, having access to medical information is one of the most profound cultural changes in our nation’s health. It’s one that I welcome. There’s a ton of health content out there on the internet. Some is good, some is ok, and some is just plain wrong. And it’s nearly impossible for google to gauge quality. But with this profound change, comes another need:

I believe it’s our role as doctors to curate and guide our patients to the best information available to us all. I call it information therapy.

We should be sending you to the best information, the best opinion, and the best tools you can use to understand and manage your health. It is a new and necessary role we have as doctors practicing in the age of the internet. So we just launched this feature in Sherpaa’s app. Here’s a screenshot of it. It’s simple, but profound. Here’s what your doctor thinks is the best of the internet, exclusively for you. We even recommend the best iPhone apps to help you manage your migraines. Your doctor, prescribing apps. Welcome to the future.